17/06/2017

Multicultural Couple Problems: Google Translated Recipes

Multicultural Relationship Problems: Google Translated Recipes

Sharing your life with someone who comes from a whole different world to yours gets adventurous at times. Mundane tasks like washing the dishes, booking appointments or cooking a meal can turn into a self-exploratory tour into your own weird habits and shortcomings.

Time teaches you to ignore these things. When you date someone from another culture for a few years you fall into this weird familiarity where cultural differences are taken for granted and not given much thought. That is, until they cause a catastrophe.

As I'm currently working full time AND trying to finish my postgraduate thesis simultaneously, my caring boyfriend, a French-speaking lifesaver from Québec, Canada, has stepped into this insanity and attempts to make my life more bearable. That comes in the form of cooking our dinners. When I drag myself home from the LUAS (the tram system in Dublin), I can freely fall on the couch, take a few deep breaths and then continue my data transcription project while Alex works his way around the kitchen.

The problem is, I used to be the one to plan the meals - as a former professional restaurant cook it was more than natural for me to come up with a few improvised meals worth eating. Not anymore. The ball has been tossed to Alex.

I've shared a few Finnish recipe sites with him to use as an inspiration.

The emphasis here is on the word FINNISH.

I don't know how Google Translate works around your native language, but I can tell you Finnish and automatic translation softwares are not friends. It hasn't been that many years since my private Finnish Facebook update about trying to find a new apartment in Helsinki turned into yours truly attempting to sell her black roommate and depressed fridge.

That probably should've worked as an indicator for me to NOT let Alex use these softwares to translate Finnish recipes. Halfway through the cooking process of chicken-cauliflower curry I heard Alex shouting from downstairs:

"You know what, I'm really starting to have doubts about this meal."

"Why's that?" I asked.

"Well I mean, I fried the chicken, I fried the cauliflower, and now they have been in the oven for like 5 minutes - but what's the point of putting them into the oven for just 5 minutes?"

"Wait - you what? Why is the curry in the oven?"

"Well the recipe says to fry the ingredients on a frying pan and then put them into the oven --"

"Oh my god! No! No it doesn't!"

"Yes it does! It says to put them into the oven for a few minutes, take them out and add the curry-flavoured yoghurt --"

"... WHAT? What did you do to the yoghurt?!"

"Well half of it is in the oven now and the rest is here on the side mixed with the curry paste, since we obviously don't have curry-flavoured yoghurt..."

"You were supposed to fry the ingredients, then add the yoghurt and curry paste on the pan and let it simmer for a few minutes!"

"Well that's obviously not what's happening in the French version of your recipe. It clearly states to add the curry-flavoured yoghurt into the mixture in the oven."

"Oh my f--"

Summa summarum: the dinner was delicious despite our linguistic shortcomings. Note to self: don't trust translation softwares.

Have you ever tried to translate things and failed massively? Do this kind of things happen in your multicultural relationship? Share your stories in the comments below!

Love, Melissa

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04/06/2017

Interview in ExpatFinder.com | New Job and Other Updates


'We have discussed this with my Canadian half and came to the conclusion that Ireland might not be the place to be for us...'

I'm not dead!
Not yet at least - turns out attempting to write your postgraduate thesis full-time while working full-time leaves you on the brink of insanity. Take my advice: sleeping four hours a night is not, repeat, NOT enough rest in the long run.

Yes, you heard it right. I got a job. It was a series of weird events and unplanned job interviews but in the end I actually landed a pretty decent position here in Dublin, nevermind the hardships immigrants occasionally face to get employed to a position that matches their level of education.

More stories of that in a bit - before that, I wanted to share this interview I did for ExpatFinder.com, a website providing information, technology and support services for a global network of expats. Their questions really concentrated more on the everyday aspect of my life in Ireland, so in case you're interested in learning how the daily ramblings of a Finnish migrant in Dublin have worked out for me, read the interview here:


So as mentioned, life has been a rollercoaster during the last month. My last semester in Trinity College Dublin is finished, which brought along the insane project of writing my postgraduate dissertation. For the past five weeks I've been running back and forth Ireland - and even flew to Scotland for a weekend - interviewing people and transcribing the data. My research concentrates on the role of cultural heritage in the creation of a sense of belonging amongst children of Russian-speaking immigrants in Ireland - in other words, how children of Russian-speaking migrants from the former USSR navigate their way with this kind of hyphenated identity, belonging to multiple places and nowhere at once. I'm head over heels with this project, and hearing people's stories and thoughts about growing up in a country different to their parents has been a truly eye-opening experience. I've also had a chance to brush up on my rusty Russian and drink a glass or two of kombucha.

As for the employment situation: for this entire time living in Dublin I've felt like I'm somehow in-between: not Irish enough to get an actual good job, my CV having written IMMIGRANT with large red letters all over it, and too educated and experienced for more casual, lower-level positions at the same time. I didn't even get a call back from a cafe despite having a vocational qualification and work experience as a restaurant cook. At the same time, whilst applying for higher-level jobs, interviewers seemed to have been genuinely surprised about my level of English - this I find a little odd. I mean, look at my CV for god's sake! I studied in a British university for a semester, lived in Canada for a year and now I'm about to finish a postgraduate degree in an Irish university - you'd expect someone like that to be pretty decent at speaking English, right? No. A quote from a recruiter: "But I mean... Your English is perfect! I really didn't expect that!"

The stigma of an immigrant in the employment market wears me out sometimes: I wish it was possible for me to attach a video recording of myself speaking English to my job applications, giving me the chance to prove I can handle this language pretty damn well. Being from Finland has turned out to be a weird paradox of expectations and prejudices - whilst majority of people have the conception that "all Scandinavians speak perfect English", there's that small portion of people who are not even sure if Finland is considered part of Europe ("Well it's not part of the EU at least, is it?"), asking me for work permits and visas. However, turns out speaking Finnish in the Dublin job market is a true blessing: the companies needing someone for their Nordic market are ready to fight for you. Once I submitted to the inevitable and decided to enter the localisation game, I accidentally created a salary bidding war between two employers who needed a Finnish-speaker with quality assurance and IT experience. I still wish it was possible for me to be useful to someone for my professional skills, not just for my Finnish language.

New blog posts about actual topics are on their way, but in the meanwhile, bear with me and my sleepless life! If you have any suggestions about topics for blog posts, hit me up!

Have you ever worked in a confidential job you're not allowed to talk about? Have you found it hard to find employment while living abroad? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

Love, Melissa

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